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Whose Karma Is It When A Person Dies Young?

Published Mayo 15, 2017 by jptan2012

When my nephew died, my initial reaction was to ask where did we go wrong. The pain and grief that I felt, that we felt, has temporarily blind-sided us to the fact that we already know. When a person is born, he or she has about 2 or 3 pre – destined date of death. Sometimes less, sometimes more. This means that when he was born this accident and death was already pre-destined and what amulets can do is to lessen the impact and move the date to the next date.

Using the above explanation it shows that when a person dies it is basically his/her karma to die at that time. If a person dies young it is basically his or her karma to die young.

The karma of the people around him, like his parents or grandparents, uncles and aunties, cousins, siblings, or wife or children is to go through the pain of the death. This kind of karma is something that is pre-determined. It is not because you did something really bad today that you experience that pain tomorrow.

I’m writing this because aside from the numerous emails of condolence and sympathy for my family and me and the parents of my nephew are emails questioning whose karma is it the nephew died young. Two emails even suggested that it was the people around him who did something wrong in this life, in this current life, that caused the death of my nephew.

I will understand those who are asking because they sincerely can’t understand why would a young boy passed away at such an early age. But those who are malicious and are asking it because they think that because I do Feng Shui and write about Buddhist amulets that I should not be experiencing these things, those are the ones who are quite difficult to understand.

Nevertheless, to answer the question ‘Whose karma is it that he died young?’ The answer is simple; it was his and his alone. It was his karma from one of his past lives. But what I know by being malicious about somebody else’s death, and then you are creating negative karma for yourself. Be worried about that and not about whose karma is it the person dies young.

For questions, comments, and suggestions please email sanaakosirickylee@gmail.com

 

Namtso Salt: A Rare Buddhist Artisan Salt Used for Protection from Negative Energy and for Enhancing Wealth Luck!

Published Nobyembre 29, 2014 by jptan2012

namtso-lake-tibet-china (2)
Despite being one of the largest salt-water lakes in Asia, Namtso is still relatively an unknown name to most people. But from this unknown lake comes one of the rarest Buddhist artisan salts that are good in combating and protecting us from negative chi and also helps generate wealth luck.
Namtso Lake is more popularly known as the ‘Heavenly Lake’ and is considered as the third holiest lake in Tibet. It is also the largest salt-water lake in Tibet.
Before China invaded Tibet, Namtso Lake is one of the most popular pilgrimage sites; inspite of it’s relatively being inaccessible. The famous Tashi Dor monastery is located at the southeastern corner of the lake. Now it has simply become a tourist spot because the Chinese government has disallowed that it be considered a pilgrimage and holy site. namsto.4
I’ve never been to Namtso Lake, but according to my Guru Lama, Namtso Lake is one of the most beautiful lakes one can ever see. Its water is turquoise in color giving it a look of an ocean. It is believed that Namtso Lake has been an apparition site of various Buddhas and Bodhisattvas, namely, Avalokitesvara (Kuan Yin in her original form), White Dzambhala, Medicine Buddha. Furthermore, it is said the Guru Rinpoche himself has declared the lake to be holy.
There is no clear history as to when it started but Namtso Lake being a holy salt-water lake, gave rise to one of the most powerful salt in combatting negative energy and helping to enhance wealth luck.
Namtso Salt is a whole round chunk of salt as big as a small baby’s head. It is usually process in a clay pot and is considered as one of the purest salt. Placing the Namtso salt in a room will protect the room from negative chi. It is extremely advisable for one to use Namtso Salt if one doesn’t know whether a Feng Shui of the room is good or bad. Furthermore, a Namtso Salt that has been blessed by a monk can drive away evil spirits.
Aside from driving away evil spirits and protecting us from negative chi, Namtso Salt placed on the center table of the living room and on the dining table acts as a very potent wealth enhancer. According to my Guru Lama, he personally witnessed this when a 2nd generation Tibetan refugee migrated to Singapore to seek for greener pastures. However, after 2 years of staying in Singapore he was unable to improve his life and has not been able to send a single centavo to his family in India. Worst, he is not even able to send letters because he was so poor that he doesn’t have money for postage and of course, emails is out of the question. Out of frustration, he seeks out the help of a monk who happens to be a student of my Guru Lama. This particular young monk then brought his story to the attention of my Guru Lama. My Guru Lama then decided to do a special puja for him, but since he has a small chunk of Namtso Salt with him, he decided to bless it and gave it to the Tibetan refugee. His luck then has since has a great turn around, it has been 10 years since it happened, and he has now went back home to India where he now has his won business. He got his capital in Singapore and has largely recognized that his luck started to change for good after he received the Namtso Salt.
Making the Namtso Salt is a very tedious process, and takes months before one is finally available.
First, Buddhist monks usually gathered fallen woods from the forest. They will the soak the woods in the Namtso Lake for 6 months. After 6 months, they will then chop the woods into smaller chunks and dry them out under the sun. The process usually takes up to 5 days. Then they will slowly burn the said wood, once the wood is burnt into ashes they will then put more Namtso Lake salt water and put it into clay pots. That’s when they’ll cook the salt. The salt is cooked once the clay pots broke. namtso salt
To my knowledge, there is only one other place who do a similar artisan salt this way, and that’s here in the Philippines. Bohol also has a similar process, but unlike the Namtso Salt the one in Bohol is made for cooking.
In using the Namtso Salt as a protection against negative energy or to drive away evil spirits, it’s advisable to place one whole Namtso Salt in each room of the house or in the room where the evil spirit dwells. If you’re confined in a hospital, it’s also good to bring one whole Namtso Salt and place it in your hospital room.
Breaking a Namtso Salt into smaller pieces can also act as protection amulet. Again it will drive away evil spirits and protect us from negative energy. It is recommended when carried on as an amulet, place a small chunk (about the size of a tablespoon) in a red cloth and carry it with you. Carrying when going to the yin places like cemeteries, hospitals, etc. will also protect us from the yin energy of the place. These small chunks will also act as a micro wealth luck enhancer.
As mentioned, to use the Namtso Salt as wealth enhancer, one can place it on the dining table and on the center table of the living room.
Placing a whole Namtso Salt on the front door will repel all negative energies, and putting them inside the toilet, will help alleviate the negative energies cause by having a toilet in that section of the house.
Taking a Namtso Salt bath is also the most effective salt bath. One you can do is get a small chunk about a size of a tablespoon and put it in the tub.
China’s invasion of Tibet has made the making of the Namtso Salt even more difficult. It was already extremely difficult to make a batch of Namtso Salt before but it was even harder now, so much so that per batch of Namtso Salts are only made every 10 to 15 years. Furthermore, this is usually smuggled out of Tibet because the Chinese government in an effort to stop Buddhism has also made it illegal to make and export Namtso Salts out of Tibet.
A very limited number of Namtso Salts is being made available for the readers of this blog thru the kindness of my Guru Lama. Proceeds of the sale of the said Namtso Salts are to be given to either for the food of the Buddhist monks or to Tibetan refugees. However, because of the bulkiness of the Namtso Salts, there will only be limited areas or countries that can receive them. Also, for shipments we might have to do it by bulk.

For your comments, suggestions, or questions please email sanaakosirickylee@gmail.com

The Happy Fat Buddha: A Representation of Maitreya Buddha’s Blessings

Published Pebrero 16, 2012 by jptan2012
Happy Fat Buddha or Laughing Buddha

Happy Fat Buddha or Laughing Buddha

Happy Fat Buddha or Laughing Buddha, as he is famously called by non-Buddhists, is undoubtedly one of the most famous and recognized image of a Buddha. The Happy Fat Buddha is in reality not a Buddha, at least, not yet. He is currently a Bodhisattva and a future Buddha who’ll replace the existing Historical Buddha which is Gautama Buddha or Sakyamuni (also spelled as Shakyamuni) Buddha. The Happy Fat Buddha or Laughing Buddha is in reality known as the Maitreya Buddha.

Buddhist scriptures states that we are currently under the ‘era’ of Sakyamuni Buddha, which is the fourth Buddha to have appeared on earth, there have been 3 others before him. It is said that his arrival will be at the time of the low point of human existence. He will come at a time where in mankind has forgotten about the Dharma (Buddhist teachings). This is not totally impossible because as shown in what is happening in Tibet, under the rule of China, the original Dharma is being purged and destroyed, albeit with extreme resistance from Tibetans and other Buddhists, but unfortunately, still with a lot of success. This answers why even after several recitations of Mantras it is still bound to happen, because it was prophesied in the Buddhist scriptures. In China, Buddhism has really taken a lot of different interpretations that are watered down. Buddhism, as any other religion in China, is closely monitored and censored by the government. Same thing is currently happening in other parts of Asia, such as Myanmar.

Going back to Maitreya Buddha or Happy Fat Buddha as he is normally called, is said to come when mankind is in need to be reminded of the Dharma. At present Maitreya Buddha is at present said to be living in Tusita Heaven, a celestial place where celestial Bodhisattvas are said to reside. In Tusita Heaven, it is said in the Buddhist scriptures, Maitreya Buddha constantly recites mantras and sutras for us. He also continuously gets lessons in preparation for his coming to earth where he’ll achieve enlightenment within 7 days and become a Buddha so that he can impart to us the Dharma.

Typically pictured seated on a throne either cross legged or feet flat on the floor, signifying that he’s waiting for his time, Maitreya is originally pictured as a slim, handsome prince. He is also usually dressed as a Indian royalty (India being the origin of Buddhism). As representation of him being a Bodhisattva, it is not uncommon to see that he is also adorned with jewels. A Khata is usually tied around his waist much like a belt.

Maitreya Buddha pictured in his original image.

Another representation of Maitreya Budda.

The idea of him pictured as a Happy Fat Buddha came about of what he represents. The Maitreya Buddha represents wealth, health, love, happiness or joy, success, peace, and harmony. In short, he represents what each person aspire for.

There are several stories as to why the image of Maitreya Buddha became that of the Happy Fat Buddha or Laughing Buddha. In fact, Maitreya is derived from Maitri which means Loving Kindness.

One of the story states that the image of the Happy Fat Buddha came about because of the Chinese buddhist monk Budai. Budai either claimed or people saw in him the qualities of Maitreya Buddha (the written history about this are not clear) that when he passed away people started using his image as the image of Maitreya Buddha.

Another story claims that Maitreya one day visited earth to share the sutras, however, all the women are unable to absorb his teachings because all they can see is a very handsome young prince and they fell in-love with him. Seeing that his image causes women to be distracted he transformed himself to a fat bald man.

Still another story is quite simple. When Buddhism was introduced in China, they’re unable to comprehend some aspect of the teachings of Buddhism. For example, Kuan Yin is a female representation of Avalokitesvara, the ‘Male’ Buddha of Compassion. However, Chinese are unable to comprehend the idea of a very loving, gentle, compassionate MALE being,  to make it easier for the people to understand the character and teachings of Avalokitesvara, they decided to represent her with a female image called Kuan Yin or Kwan Sheer Yin (He or She who hears the cries of the world). Allow me to briefly share here that it is said that it is Avalokitesvara himself who instructed some Indian and Tibetan monks through a vision to represent him as Kuan Yin. This is not totally veering away from reality, because in truth, celestial Buddhist gods are androgynous, they are neither male or female, or it can be said they are both male and female. Since at that time Chinese always associates wealth and health with plumpness, and happiness, love, harmony with a happy face, these characteristics became the representation of Maitreya Buddha in China.

Personally, I believe that the 3rd story is the most plausible explanation.

When I come across a big image of the Maitreya Buddha as a the Happy Fat Buddha or Laughing Buddha, or when I pray to him, I usually rub his stomach to signify the asking of blessing. It’s an affectionate gesture. However, never touch the head of a Buddha, because in Buddhism it is only monks, your elders or superiors who can touch the head of a person who is ‘beneath’ them.

Aside from ‘Happy Fat Buddha’, ‘Laughing Buddha’, Maitreya Buddha is also called ‘Metteya’, ‘Puy Lok Yah’ (Fookien term for The Happy Fat Father), ‘Mi Lo Fu’ in Chinese, ‘Mile (pronounced as Mee-Lay) Pusa’ also in Chinese, Miroku Bosatsu in Japanese, Mireuk Bosal in Korean, Phra Sri Araya Metrai in Thai.

Most of the images of the Happy Fat Buddha depicts him on a relax mode. There’s another image of him on his legs. Either of the two images are considered very auspicious.

Placing the image of Maitreya Buddha, either as the handsome young prince or as the Happy Fat Buddha or Laughing Buddha helps generate his blessings of happiness, harmony, love, peace, wealth, good health, etc. However, in the Philippines it is easier to get his image as the Laughing Buddha. Also this particular image also gives a psychological effect for all those who see it. It reminds us to be happy, it reminds us to become positive, and at the very least, because of how he looks as the Happy Fat Buddha, it creates an atmosphere of happiness and harmony.

You can place his image either on your altar, or any parts of your house except in the bedroom (for married couples) and or in the rest room.

This is from my personal collection. I wear this pendant everyday. In choosing an image of the Happy Fat Buddha to be worn as a pendant, always look for the face. Make sure that it has happy jolly face.

Wearing an image of the Maitreya Buddha as a pendant is also very auspicious and serves as an homage to him. In return, you get to tap into his blessings.

When I was designing the WISH FULFILLING AND BUDDHA’S BLESSING MANTRA PENDANT, a pendant that I initially designed for myself and for my family but has since then become a popular charm for my readers garnering a lot of very positive personal testimonies, my frustration is not having enough space to include the image of the Happy Fat Buddha. However, since I have a separate Happy Fat Buddha pendant I see no need to include. I’m just happy that the WISH FULFILLING AND BUDDHA’S BLESSING MANTRA PENDANT has since then become an instrument of good luck to a lot of my readers.

NOTE: This post was edited on Dec. 2, 2013.

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