Merit

All posts tagged Merit

How to Help A Dying Person From Moving On To a Better Next Life!

Published Marso 3, 2017 by jptan2012

Today’s post has something to do with reincarnation. I decided to write about this because of a recent incident that I shall share with you in the next few days.

Anyway, all of us commute to work, school, meetings, malls, restaurant, etc. And we travel, some daily some not as often but all of us will be on the road at some point in our life.

When on the road, there are times that we will encounter an accident or see an accident. It’s degree of severity may vary but when we see a grave accident with people who are hurt and are about to die or has died, it will be very well for us to help them realized they’re dead so that they can easily enter samsara or move on to the next life again.

How do we do this?

For Buddhist who knows how to take refuge, mentally do it for the dying person or for the one who died. Take the refuge, and mentally say that the merit is given to those who are involved in the accident.

Chanting some mantras and imagining its energies becoming a purple ball of fire, then you mentally throwing to the dying or newly dead should help.

The mantras that you should recite are the following (please do this in the same order as it is written):

  1. OM AMI DEWA HRIH (7X)
  2. OM MUNI MUNI MAHA MUNI YE SOHA (7X)
  3. TADYATHA OM BHEKANDZYE BHEKANDZYE MAHA BHEKNADZYE RADZA SAMUGATE SOHA (7X)
  4. OM MANI PADME HUM (3X)
  5. OM AH KSITIGARBHA THALENG HUM (3X)
  6. OM VAJRAPANI HUM (3X)
  7. TADYATHA OM GATE GATE PARAGATE PARASAMGATE BODHI SOHA (7X)

While chanting the mantras slowly imagine that the mantras are becoming a ball of purple fire or energy. After you’ve finished chanting imagine it being thrown to the dying person or to those who just died. This will help their consciousness recognized that they just died or are dying.

In Buddhism also chanting loudly the mantras of the Buddhas and Bodhisattvas will help the person attain a better next life.

If you have the Vajrapani Ruel(1) or Surangama Mantra Amulet(1), you can also put it on their chest or forehead, if the relatives or the authorities allowed you to do it, or at the very least pass it over them three times.

If you have the Vajrapani Ruel(2) and can’t remember all the mantras to chant, and does not feel comfortable approaching the dying person, hold it on your receiving hand (if you are right handed your receiving hand is your left hand and vice versa), and then chant OM VAJRAPANI HUM, while chanting imagine the energy coming from the Vajrapani Ruel(3) then slowly let it flow through your arms to your chest to move to your giving hand (which is your other hand) and then raise your giving hand, much like praying over somebody, then imagine the energy going to the dying person or newly dead one and let it’s energy clean it’s consciousness (or soul).

Wouldn’t it by doing this we are assuming that the person is dying (if not yet dead)? Yes it would, but the good thing doing this will cleanse its consciousness but it is also a healing act. They need the burst of energy and it might jolt them back to life.

I’m quite sure that a lot of you will be worried that by doing this the consciousness of the person might go after you, and you might attract the negative chi that cause the accident. By simply chanting the mantras, even if it is for them, you are already protecting yourself. And remember, there is no bad thing that will come out from a good thing.

For questions, comments, and suggestions please email sanaakosirickylee@gmail.com

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SIMPLE RULE IN LIGHTING INCENSE FOR THE BUDDHAS OR BODHISATTVAS!

Published Hunyo 20, 2016 by jptan2012

KONICA MINOLTA DIGITAL CAMERA

There is a simple rule in lighting incense as an offering for the Buddhas or Bodhisattvas. Treat the incense as something for the Buddha or Bodhisattva, so do not smell its fragrance. When holding it, and incense has a wooden stick at the bottom, then do not hold or touch the incense, simple hold the wooden part.

Never ever offer incense that has fallen off the floor.

Following these simple rules will show your respect to the Buddha or Bodhisattva and it will increase the merit of the act.

What To Do When You Have No Other Choice But to Face Your Bad Direction?

Published Mayo 4, 2016 by jptan2012

All of us have our own four lucky directions and four unlucky directions base on our Kua number, which in turn is base on our birth date. If you are not yet familiar with this I suggest you read the following posts that were written 4 years ago:

It is important that you get to read them first before you read this post for you to understand this article better.

Now the ideal situation is you totally avoid having your house or office face any of your bad directions, or facing your bad direction while working or sleeping. However, in reality we can’t always avoid these directions. If you are a couple, always take note that the head of the family should always face the good directions. But whether you are a couple or single person and you can’t avoid facing your bad directions, please do the following to help temper the effects of the bad direction.

  1. Make a weekly offering to the Buddhas or Bodhisattvas or Taoist Gods. In making an offering of incense, flowers, water, or even food you create a lot of good merit or energy of yourself. This will help temper the bad effects of having to face your bad directions.
  2. Wear a powerful amulet and highly recommend the Vajrapani Ruel and/or the Surangama Mantra Amulet. Wearing a powerful amulet will help protect you from the negative effects of having to face your bad directions.
  3. Do good deeds and do them sincerely. Feed the animals; donate to the charity, etc. Sincerely doing good deeds will help temper the negative effects of having to face your bad directions.

Remember though, it is better if you avoid your bad directions. These cures are temporary or at best they just temper the bad effects.

 

For questions, comments, and suggestions please email sanaakosirickylee@gmail.com

Myth Buster 25: All Buddhist Believes in the Power of Wearing Buddhist Images and Amulets

Published Hunyo 17, 2015 by jptan2012

If you talk about Buddhism, you inevitably talk about the images of the Buddhas, Bodhisattvas, amulets, and auspicious symbols. However, one of the most common misconceptions is that all Buddhists believe in the power of wearing amulets and other Buddhist images.

Front side of my Kuan Yin Pendant

Front side of my Kuan Yin Pendant

Well…that’s the straight answer and it is outwardly the correct answer but not entirely correct other. Let me present it to you the best way I can.

The past years and more recently saw the rise in popularity of the WISH FULFILLING AND BUDDHA’S BLESSING MANTRA PENDANT (this is no longer available for request) and more recently the VAJRAPANI RUEL(1). The Wish Fulfilling and Buddha’s Blessing Mantra pendant cannot be considered as an amulet. The truth is I really don’t know how to call it, but technically speaking, and strictly speaking it is also not a Feng Shui Charm, what it is simply a collection of images of what I think are the essential images of Buddhas, Mantras, and other Buddhist symbols. I combined them together, ask a jeweler to make it into a pendant and it proved to be quite effective. What it is simply is the collection of the images, I believe one of the reason that it has become so powerful is “there is strength in numbers”.

The Vajrapani Ruel on the other hand is a very powerful amulet, perhaps as mentioned one of the most powerful amulet in the Buddhist pantheon. Although strictly speaking it is not an amulet but a ruel. It was last made about half a century ago. If you wish to know more about it you can read about it by clicking on the following – THE WORLD’S MOST POWERFUL AMULET IN THE BUDDHIST PANTHEON CALLED VAJRAPANI RUEL.

The Vajrapani Ruel looks simple, maybe even rustic, but this simple amulet is packed with a special talisman paper inside, with various ingredients, which includes Namtso Salt, soil, various herbs and plants, crystal, and a relic from a high lama. It's important to put the ruel inside a amulet holder or something sturdy as to not ruin it. If the cloth had tear which exposes or spill the ingredients inside, the ruel becomes useless.

The Vajrapani Ruel looks simple, maybe even rustic, but this simple amulet is packed with a special talisman paper inside, with various ingredients, which includes Namtso Salt, soil, various herbs and plants, crystal, and a relic from a high lama. It’s important to put the ruel inside a amulet holder or something sturdy as to not ruin it. If the cloth had tear which exposes or spill the ingredients inside, the ruel becomes useless.

But let us go back to the question whether all Buddhists believes in the power of amulets. Until very recently I believe that all school or lineage of Buddhism do believe in the wearing amulets, or even wearing images of the auspicious symbols and Buddhas and Bodhisattvas. Until I met a Zen master.

The very first thing this Zen master shared with me is that amulets don’t work, images of Buddhas and Bodhisattvas doesn’t carry any special power. Zen Buddhism is like the protestant of Christianity; they are quite strict and simple with their belief. That is comparatively speaking with other schools or lineage of Buddhism. If you look at their temple or monastery, it is so much simpler, but they still have and pay tremendous amount of respect to the images of Buddhas, Bodhisattvas or other dharma instruments or symbol. They even have special clothes to wear when attending a puja, and once worn, this clothing, which looks like a robe can’t be worn inside the toilet, there’s even a proper way of walking once the robe has been worn. On the other hand, when told this Zen master about the story how a Vajrapani Ruel(2) help eradicate the bad karma of a young monk, this Zen master loved the story asked my permission to share it with others but slightly change it by avoiding to mention the part where the Vajrapani Ruel(3) is mentioned.

Are they then contradicting their own teachings by paying so much respect to the dharma instruments, and Buddha and Bodhisattva images and then teach people not to believe this will help them. It seems to be so. However, if you look deeper, it is not actually the case. They believe what they say and they practice it. How?

The truth is images of Buddhas, Bodhisattvas, and other Buddhist images or symbols or simply that symbols. It is our intention and acceptance of what it represents that puts meaning into it. This representation is not exclusive to human, but other sentient beings and heavenly beings see that representation as well. And that makes it effective.

But Zen Buddhism masters are very cautious in drawing attention to the power of these symbols or images because they’re very cautious that they may lead people to do the wrong kind of attachment. Wrong understanding of something leads to wrong views, which leads to false belief.

I pointedly ask the Zen master about wearing of Buddhist images, this Zen master refused to used the power to be associated with the pendants, but this Zen master did say that there is merit in wearing these images, and that the merit gathered is also associated with the virtue that the Buddha or Bodhisattva or dharma instrument represents. Note though that this was a much longer conversation and it was not presented in black and white. But ultimately this Zen master acknowledged that there is merit and that sometimes these merits depend on the nature of our intention. Merit is the term used in Zen Buddhism about gaining some ‘luck’ in a certain act.

So to answer the said question. Do all Buddhists believe in the power of wearing images of the Buddhas, Bodhisattvas and other dharma or auspicious symbols? No. But then again, there is merit to it, which will bring some blessings. So maybe it’s a yes. The intricacies lie in the fact that it depends on your intention and how much are you attached to the superficial benefits.

For comments, suggestions, and questions please email sanaakosirickylee@gmail.com

Paying Homage to Kuan Yin, the Buddha of Compassion!

Published Pebrero 21, 2012 by jptan2012

I intentionally wrote 3 different posts about Kuan Yin (also spelled as Guan Yin, Quan Yin, Kwan Yin, Gwan Yin), because there is simply a lot to write about Kuan Yin. The first post is KUAN YIN: THE ONE WHO HEARS THE CRIES OF THE WORLD. The second post is UNDERSTANDING MERCY AND COMPASSION: THE TRANSFORMATION OF AVALOKITESVARA TO KUAN YIN.

Kuan Yin is also called ‘The Goddess of Mercy’, ‘Buddha of Compassion’, ‘Bodhisattva of Compassion’, ‘Guan Shi Yin’, ‘Kannon’ in Japan, ‘Avalokitesvara’ also spelled as Avalokiteshvara, ‘Chenrezig’, ‘Guanzizai’ are just some of the way she’s addressed.

However, allow me to share a few ways of paying homage to Kuan Yin. One way of paying homage to Kuan Yin is by inviting her into our house. It’s important that her image is placed on a ‘good’ spot. If possible, place her near the entrance, but do not put her in the kitchen, dining room, restroom and bedroom of married couples. Inviting her image to our home or office creates a lot of merit, and by simply having her image around us makes us closer to Kuan Yin.

You can also offer incense, clean water, flowers, fruits; lighted candles is also a very auspicious way of paying homage to the Bodhisattva of Compassion.

Wearing her image as pendant either in gold or a semi-precious stone like jade  is also a way of paying homage to Kuan Yin. It also gives us a visual representation of our ‘relationship’ to Kuan Yin that it helps us to become closer to the Bodhisattva.

My own Kuan Yin pendant has her sutra and other prayers written on the back. Any image of Kuan Yin will do, however, if you can get something that’s similar to my pendant the better. The bigger one has the shortest sutra in the world, the Heart Sutra that is largely associated with Kuan Yin. The smaller pendant has the White Robed Kuan Yin prayer. In Buddhism wearing or carrying sutras and prayers brings the same effect as if you saying it yourself. It has an effect of you continuously saying the sutra or prayer. You can also get a miniature Heart Sutra and carry it with your body, aside from being an homage to the Kuan Yin this serves as an instrument of your continues blessing from Kuan Yin.

Still another way of paying homage to Kuan Yin is by ‘sharing’ her with other people. Talking to people about Kuan Yin is one way of homage to Kuan Yin. You can do this orally or you can do this in written format. In the age of internet, this had become easier, because simply writing about her on your blog, or Facebook or Twitter account a lot of people get to know more about her. You can also buy several copies of the Heart Sutra or several of her images and share it to your friends and/or even strangers; it’s another way of paying homage to her.

There are many ways of paying homage to Kuan Yin, and you can come up with your own unique way of paying homage to her. However, I believe one best way of paying homage to Kuan Yin other than inviting her to our home or office and wearing her image as pendant is by chanting her mantra.

Reciting or chanting the mantra of Kuan Yin or Avalokitesvara is not only an act of homage, but it gives us a lot of merit from Kuan Yin. If you’re facing a big problem, recite her mantra and she will immediately come to your aid.

The Mantra of the Buddha of Compassion, Kuan Yin is OM MANI PADME HUM.

If you want to know more about Kuan Yin do read my first two posts about her. The first one is KUAN YIN: THE ONE WHO HEARS THE CRIES OF THE WORLD and the second one is UNDERSTANDING MERCY AND COMPASSION: THE TRANSFORMATION OF AVALOKITESVARA TO KUAN YIN.

Symbolic Script of the Mantra of the Buddha of Compassion

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